Some thoughts on this

Re: The Most Amazing Achievement of Week 1 -- Jean Ichbiah
Posted by Hannes Frischat , Wed, Nov 27, 2002, 01:32:17 Reply Top Forum

Of course, professional skeptics are going to say that this is because people doing a contest are especially motivated... but I think this week's participants have once more shown that text-entry on a PDA is a realistic proposal.

I think both is true. Of course it lies in the nature of competitions that their rules specialize real-life conditions. Runners at the olympic games for example use special shoes, wear, diet, coaches, training methods and motivation you will hardly find in real life.

On the other hand competitions bring forward the real life abilities. If you take away the special shoes and wear of a good runner he will still be a good runner. So competitions are part of the culture of self-education, as long as they are in friendship.

And competitions reflect the overall abilities. In a country where it is more natural to run for everybody, like in some countries of africa, more exceptional talents for competitions will be found.

My conclusions are:

1. The Dom Perignon contest is specialized, that is true, and the average speed may be higher than real life speed - on all methods.

2. Nevertheless such a contest assists people in learning their input method. If you once have been fast under contest conditions you can use it in real life also - somewhat slower but still fast.

3. The test reflects the general writing speed of the methods. Everybody can draw his or hers own conclusions then.

Example: Every graffiti user I have met in past has been around 15 wpm at the first shot (very experienced power users 18 wpm). If I write on paper per hand I reach 25 wpm. With FitalyStamp in real life I am between 30 and 35 WPM. So in real life FitalyStamp for me is faster than writing per hand and at least double as fast as graffiti. And you will find this ratio in the DP table at the end of the competition.


Regards

Hannes Frischat


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