Instant Text — Glossary Includes

Shell Glossaries

Another way to work with Includes is with "shell glossaries" that contain only Includes and otherwise no Word or Phrase entries.

For example, we first create an empty shell glossary called "Lee.glo". Then we can add Includes to produce the following shell glossary:

[Glossary Lee]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Dr Lee.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Cardiology.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Medical Base.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Address.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Drug List.glo]

We now have two different glossaries for Lee. One is the compiled glossary "Dr Lee.glo" and the other is the shell glossary "Lee.glo" which contains nothing else than Includes.

Of course, this idea can be combined with that of "Includes within Includes" and this produces:

[Glossary Lee]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Dr Lee.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Cardiology.glo]
[include C:\InstText\Glossary\Full Base.glo]

Whether you use shell glossaries or the direct approach shown in Specialties la carte is a matter of personal preference. Those who use shell glossaries very often do so because they like the symmetrical way of handling all glossaries. Shell glossaries can also be used very effectively in building transcription systems.